Thursday, May 12, 2016

Can You Homeschool When You're Living with Chronic Illness?

May 12, 2016 0 Comments
My chronic illness didn’t become severe until my last homeschooled child was a junior in high school.  By this time in his education, he was very good at self-directed learning.  

Because I don’t have the expertise to handle high-school math or science, we were already using DVD learning as well as tutors (when necessary).  He and I were sailing along smoothly with a Classical/Charlotte Mason mix of homeschooling.  I must confess that he has been the easiest child to teach I’ve had!
By the time my children were in 9th grade, they were in charge of their own assignment book.  I would record the assignment, and they were to keep it up and  check off their work.  I would check their work and grade their homework and quizzes/tests.  We had a system for making flashcards and other drills, etc.  
Other study skills were taught so that the goal was to be ready for college classes.  I’m glad he was prepared, because by the 11th grade I was very unwell.  He took my plans and took over his education.  He was very driven and diligent and things went well.  We hit a few bumps, but his sister tutored him a little.

He took a heavy load his junior and senior year.  He was able to join a homeschool book club, debate club and an informal chess club.  His senior year was tough, but he did have a wonderful math tutor for Calculus.  Although I spent much of the time in bed, he was very hard-working and worked around my sickness. 
 The Charlotte Mason approach was very good because he did a lot of writing/summaries.  This is wonderful for college preparation and he was ready for his English classes.  He just finished 4 of them with all A’s.

I think having a sick mom helped him to learn to be compassionate and put other’s first.  He always was a person who was caring, but this probably made him more sensitive to the needs of others.  
So, don’t let your chronic illness stop you from homeschooling.  Pray for God’s direction.  Find a curriculum plan that won’t wear you out.  Be flexible with your plan and your time.  Love your kids!

@2016, copyright Lisa Ehrman

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