Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Homeschooling Without the Rose-Colored Glasses

September 20, 2016 0 Comments

Homeschooling Without the Rose-Colored Glasses


Because I’ve completed my years of homeschooling, I have the benefit of hindsight.  I also like to be completely honest, and not just write to get lots of readers on my blog.  So, today I would like to talk about some of the negative things that can happen as a result of homeschooling.  They may or may not happen in your home.



Some children can grow up to be unhappy with your choice to homeschool them.  They may seem happy when they’re young and at home.  When they’re older and look back on things, their opinion may change.  Maybe they might feel that their education wasn’t adequate to prepare them for the job market or college.  They might feel that they missed out on other things in life.  I’ve personally seen these things happen.  Some children aren’t provided a top-quality education and therefore miss out on job opportunities.  I’ve seen this happen far too often, and it’s very sad.

One other thing that is a negative is that mom is also a teacher.  It’s hard to wear two distinct hats with your children.  For me, I was a certified teacher.  This made it even harder.  I felt the teacher within me very strong.  I come from a long line of teachers, and always wanted to be a teacher.  So, was I supposed to “Be” a teacher until 3, and then “Be” Mom after 3?



This was a little weird.  Over time, it got easier.  Homeschool moms have to find that middle ground.  We need to be mom, but also a firm teacher.  There should be a plan in which your “students” succeed in learning everything that is expected of them.  The student must be accountable for what needs to be learned.  And, we do it with the love and understanding of a mom who really “knows” how they learn.  This enables us to teach them better than anyone else.  What a job!

No rose-colored glasses here.  It was tough job, but I loved homeschooling my children.  God bless you as you do the same.
@2016, copyright Lisa Ehrman

Sunday, September 18, 2016

Chronic Illness & Everyday Worship

September 18, 2016 0 Comments
My physical therapist insisted that I have at least one massage per month.  Although it’s expensive, I told her we would try for at least one thirty-minute massage per month.  She said that with my back and joint problems that I absolutely needed this for my health.

I haven’t had a massage in a few years, because of the price.  I know that they are really beneficial to my health, but aren’t covered by insurance.  All my other therapies are covered, so I don’t hesitate to continue keep them up.  Today I had a 30 minute session and I was determined to make the most of it.
When I arrived, I was having a dizzy spell and could barely stand.  It was such a relief to get undressed and resting flat on the massage table.  The room was a little too warm and the essential oil scent was starting to make me nauseated.  After a few minutes the spell was over and I began to feel better.  The therapist used unscented oil on my back.  I made certain that she understood my conditions: Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Scoliosis and that my shoulders were unstable.  I felt this was enough since she would only work on my back today.  She decided to not work too deep, which was just about perfect.


She did work on the knots in my neck and upper back area, though.  These knots are always present and even without severe rubbing, the knots were much better.  I began to feel better.  I usually have to remind myself to relax during massage.  Even with the new age music and dull lighting, my mind will spin with all of my problems or to-do list.
I thought I would pray, and thought about all my kid’s prayer needs.  Then, I thought, “No, I’m going to pray for me.”  I prayed for the massage to help me.  Then I started to meditate on Scripture verses.  All the verses that I could think of about thankfulness, salvation, everything.  I mediated on hymns that I love and I began to worship God.  Then I started focusing on the verse – I am fearfully and wonderfully made.  This brought tears to my eyes.  As I was laying there in pain, realizing that my body was so messed up and had so many health problems – and yet, I am fearfully and wonderfully made…just the way I’m designed to be.
I’m so thankful for God and for His wisdom.
 I will praise thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully made: marvellous are thy works; and that my soul knoweth right well.  Ps 139:14
@2016, copyright Lisa Ehrman

Chronic Illness Is Enough: I Don't Need More Stress

September 18, 2016 0 Comments
Chronic illness brings a level of stress with it, naturally.  You worry about each day.  Finances are many times stressful.  The future is frightening; not knowing how much worse your health will get.  The list of stressors is very long when you suffer with chronic health problems.

Now that the country is dealing with so many events that cause us worry and stress, such as terrorism and uncertainty, it’s even more difficult for those of us with chronic illness.  
When our bodies are under a daily burden of physical stress and then become bombarded with mental or emotional stress, it can be a severe problem.  It’s important that we find a way to release this stress and not hold it in to do damage.
Most of us know this and have found various ways to cope with stress.  We’ve read articles and heard how we should mediate/pray, exercise, have hobbies, or watch a funny movie to help get rid of some of the stress in our lives.  Lately, with life getting overwhelming, we may need to add one or more things to our stress-fighting bag.
When I go to my pain-management doctors, they always recommend that I visit a Pain-Psychologist.  I haven’t made that a priority, but it probably would be a very good way to work on relieving stress.  

I know some people get angry or sad when stress gets overwhelming and they need more human contact.  If you’re unable to visit those you love, you could call your friends or family or skype them.
Another good thing to do might be to check out an interest you’ve had, such as music or art.  Your city probably has cheap or free classes for art where you could also meet  other people.  
You could listen to or play music.  Try something new or an old favorite.  Praying is my favorite, because God’s peace is powerful in my life when I spend time in prayer.
Disclaimer: I’m not a doctor or psychologist, but these recommendations are my opinion.  If you need medical help, please consult your personal physician.
@2016, copyright Lisa Ehrman

Homeshool Field Trips: Family or Group?

September 18, 2016 0 Comments

When you take field trips in your homeschool, do you prefer to take them with a large group or just with your family?  Most people think of a field trip as a class of same-age children walking around with their teacher and a couple of chaperones.  They have gotten off their bright yellow school bus and march into a museum in a row.  

They’re all wearing name tags and the teacher leads them through the museum as a guide tells them something about each exhibit.  They move from one item to another quickly.  Some children are listening intently and others are paying attention to each other or something out the window.


You can see that I’m a homeschool mom at heart.  After participating in the large group field trips and our slow family field trips, I much prefer the family trips.  When our family takes a field trip, we think of them as a vacation or fun.  We love going to see a historical site or natural place.  We take our time if we see something interesting to us.  We let each child read as much as they want about what interests them.
When our youngest took his senior trip in DC, he spent most of his time in only one of the museums.  That was fine with us.  He was soaking up all he was learning there, because he loved it.  That’s what learning is all about!  Field trips aren’t for testing, they’re for fun and maybe sparking a new passion for learning.
So I say, if you can, take some field trips the slow way.  You’ll love it!
@2016, copyright Lisa Ehrman

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